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If you use scrapers, you need the SVD-110 jig!
Click image to enlarge

Tormek SVD-110 Tool Rest

Engineered Simplicity

Text & Photos by Tom Hintz

   The simplistic appearance of the Tormek SVD-110 Tool Rest may cause some to underestimate its usefulness. Sharpening scrapers may be the primary interest of woodturners but the SVD-110 Tool Rest handles carving scorps and inshaves as well. Even screwdrivers can be "tuned up" on this handy jig.
   While this review focuses on sharpening scrapers, the Tormek instruction manual contains detailed instructions on using the SVD-110 Tool Rest with carving scorps, inshaves and cabinet scrapers.

About The Jig

The patented Torlock makes adjusting and securing the SVD-110 fast and easy.
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   The SVD-110 Tool Rest is made from a special aluminum extrusion that is very rigid and features a sophisticated mounting boss design that allows a simple finger-tightened knob to effectively lock it in virtually any position on the Universal Support. The Tormek engineers devised (and patented) the Torlock design that increases the locking power generated by the locking knob by an astounding 250%! The non-engineering explanation is that because of it's shape, only a portion of the hole's sides contact the round support bar when the locking knob is tightened. The small contact area concentrates the pressure exerted by the locking knob, drastically reducing the amount of tension needed to lock the SVD-110 Tool Rest in place.
   The working surface of the SVD-110 Tool Rest is 3 3/8"-wide by 4 ¼"-long and provides ample support for sharpening any woodturning scrapers. The work surface is a series of narrow ribs that reduce the friction generated by sliding tools during sharpening. The platform can be ground smaller or re shaped to clear the handles of smaller tools.

Coming and Going

The SVD-110 can be used in the horizontal (Top) or vertical (Bottom) positions, allowing the stone to grind towards or away from the tool.
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   The SVD-110 Tool Rest can be mounted to the Universal Support arm in the horizontal or vertical position, changing the direction of the stone as it is presented to the tool. This is an important feature for woodturners who have wide-ranging opinions on the preferred type of scraper edge. When mounted horizontally, the grinding wheel turns away from the scraper. In the vertical position, the wheel turns towards the tool being sharpened.
   Changing the stone's direction as it relates to the scraper, combined with various finishing techniques, gives the operator total control over the style of edge created. An advantage that the slow-speed, water cooled Tormek enjoys is that the burr it creates is much more refined than a burr generated by dry grinding. The amount of burr present is also more easily controlled with the SVD-110 Tool Rest on the Tormek. The Tormek instruction book offers extensive information on managing burrs, including how to "ticket" or burnish a freshly sharpened scraper.

Fast Setup

The SVD-110 makes it easy to match an existing angle or the Pro Angle Finder can be used to precisely dial in a new angle.
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   Setting the SVD-110 Tool Rest up is very easy, in part because the position of the Universal Support arm is less of a factor than with some other jigs. Set the arm so the SVD-110 Tool Rest is very close to the stone and from there we only need adjust it's angle to the stone. I have occasionally had to make small adjustments to the Support Arm, but they are always small, fast and easy.
   Because the SVD-110 Tool Rest can be secured at any position, replicating the grinding angle is simple. If a new angle is desired, the Tormek Pro Angle Finder can be used to set the SVD-110 Tool Rest precisely.

Touch Up

   The SVD-110 Tool Rest makes maintaining a sharp edge on your scraper during a turning project fast and

Scrapers are simple tools that produce much better results when sharpened properly. The SVD-110 jig makes that easy.
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easy. Using the SP-650 Stone Grader, I put the fine (1000-grit) surface on the stone wheel, set the SVD-110 Tool Rest for the angle on my scraper and go back to it occasionally while turning to freshen the cutting edge. It takes a minute or two to set up the SVD-110 Tool Rest and less than a minute to make two or three passes on the stone wheel when needed. The difference at the lathe is substantial and well worth the effort.
   Some woods tend to "fuzz up" at the end grain when turned. I have found that with the SVD-110 Tool Rest I can freshen the edge on my scraper and make a couple of light passes at higher rpm that drastically reduces the sanding required.
   If you use scrapers at the lathe, the SVD-110 Tool Rest is a valuable accessory for the Tormek Sharpening System. It is fast and easy to use, leaving you with few excuses for not keeping an optimum edge on your scrapers throughout a turning project.

An extra Universal Support makes setting up for scrapers almost instant!
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Tip: Because the scraper is such an often-used tool, and many woodturners grind most or all of their scrapers at the same angle, many are buying a separate Universal Support just for the SVD-110 Jig. Many who upgraded to the new style Universal Support with the fine adjustment wheel use their old model for this.
Set the SVD-110 up on the "spare" Universal Support and leave it there. Then, when using your scrapers, all you need do is install that support, set the distance from the stone and you are ready to touch up your scrapers in seconds!

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